2004: The legal profession, a risky business


LWBQ's structure continues to develop and grow stronger. The organization is now managed by a board of directors and an all-volunteer management committee. ASFQ begins to stand out and obtains its first grant from an institutional funder: the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA). 


In Colombia, in a context of increasing criminalization of defence lawyers, CIDA supports the 2004-2005 Program to train and protect lawyers and human rights defenders. This funding enables six missions involving nine lawyers who participate in over 60 activities in 11 cities. In total, over 1100 people benefit directly from LWBQ's initiatives, which aim to: 

  • provide assistance to lawyers who face security problems;
  • provide training on human rights and the legal profession;
  • share experiences in the context of the Colombian penal code reform;
  • create a professional body of lawyers.

In Nigeria, following the successful result in the Amina Lawal case, several other examples of cruel punishments are observed, which justify the continuation of our actions in the country.

LWBQ joins the efforts to identify these cases, and even sends representatives to visit prisons. This approach produces results: a prisoner is released after a joint visit with the Minister of Justice to xxx prison.

 


 

 

 


In Peru, following an invitation from a Peruvian member of LWBQ, an exploratory mission is initiated to assess the human rights situation in the country, to understand the ins and outs of Peru's criminal law reform and to evaluate the possibilities for intervention with potential partners.